A day with Steph Curry… (seriously)

Sometimes in life things just work out for whatever reason…

Most of you know I am a Strength and Conditioning Coach and work on special projects at Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, OR which gives me crazy opportunities to meet great people and do amazing things. Outside of that I chase my dream of working with basketball players 24/7 with Shoot 360 and my own stuff. Any way, it just so happened that one of the guys I have trained and becomes friends with was Steph Curry’s college teammate. (Thanks Bryant!)

So yesterday, a group of us met up at Shoot 360 in Vancouver, WA and literally played shooting games. THE COMPETITION WAS FIERCE! We probably got about 400 or so shots up and competed on every one. (I won’t tell you who won) BUT, it was seriously fun. The crazy thing is, we got feedback on every single shot using the Noah Shooting System. Literally, a perfect day for a basketball junkie.

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Here’s Craig Moody owner of Shoot 360 explaining the science of what a perfect shot looks like.

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I won’t tell you exact numbers, but when Steph Curry shoots a ball there is almost no deviation in arc entry point and his control is RIDICULOUS.

I had one question for Steph, which if I’m thinking, I know many other players are thinking. I’ve always been fascinated by “unlimited range” but to be honest have never had it. Now don’t get me wrong, I shot close to 45% for my career from the three point line in college, but I have never had “unlimited” range. I feel like my shot becomes labored the deeper I get out.

What is the biggest factor in range?

Steph watched me shoot a handful of shots and gave me a little feedback.

1. One motion shooting – my shot is two parts, and it takes away from my strength/power

2. When you dip the ball too much, you lose the power you’ve created. You can dip with your legs, but when you start having too many moving parts like moving the ball around bad things happen.

3. This one I picked up from watching him shoot – He sets his feet in a way that gives his body the freedom to move naturally – some say it “unlocks” your shoulders, takes tension out of your body… whatever it is, it works for him and may work for you too.

Love this breakdown from my friend Collin

Yes, Steph Curry can shoot the ball, but the thing that I was most impressed with was him as a person. I literally felt like I was shooting with one of my friends, the good healthy competition you experience as a kid. He was one of the guys for the day. Incredible experience!

Here’s some great reads on shooting for you

http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/10703246/golden-state-warriors-stephen-curry-reinventing-shooting-espn-magazine

http://www.mercurynews.com/marcus-thompson/ci_25133842/thompson-stephen-currys-consistency-is-key-his-shot

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  • Robert

    Great article. I’ve been modeling my shot after steph’s by studying his form on YouTube videos. I now turn my feet in order to align my hips and shooting arm to the basket like him. Doing so definitely helps to relive tension on your shoulders and keep your elbow in.

    I’ve also found that finding which eye is your dominant eye ( the eye you use most for aiming) is also important. Knowing this can help determine where your set point should be so that your shot is more accurate. For example, i’m right handed but left eye dominant so i moved my set point more in front of my right eye since i use my left for aiming and this has had a huge impact on my accuracy.

    Also, make sure your release ends above the basket otherwise your shot will be flat and often short. All these things have really helped my shot. Good shooting!

    • Henry

      Good stuff! Appreciate the feedback. #hb